Frazier History Museum

Filtering by: LET'S TALK

Welcoming our Heroes Home: Bridging the Divide
Oct
1
5:00 PM17:00

Welcoming our Heroes Home: Bridging the Divide

The Frazier History Museum and Kentucky Opera present:
Welcoming Our Heroes Home: Bridging the Divide

An evening of conversation, camaraderie, and live performances exploring the journeys of local combat veterans, their families, and a community that welcomes them home. This discussion is inspired by Kentucky Opera’s upcoming performances of Glory Denied, based on the story of Colonel James Thompson, America’s longest-held surviving prisoner of war. Upon returning home from Vietnam nine years after his capture, Thompson was greeted only by his wife, Alyce. Neglected by his country and forgotten by his young children, Jim and his painful reunion with Alyce are the subjects of Glory Denied, an achingly beautiful story of life in the aftermath of war.

Join us for an evening of discussion with local veterans sharing their personal experiences.

Free admission and pizza courtesy of Papa John’s Veteran Employee Resource Group.

View Event →
LET'S TALK | BRIDGING THE DIVIDE - Hate Crimes and Their Resurgence
Sep
4
5:00 PM17:00

LET'S TALK | BRIDGING THE DIVIDE - Hate Crimes and Their Resurgence

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2019
DOORS OPEN 5 PM | ACCESS TO FIRST FLOOR EXHIBITS 5-6 PM | PANEL DISCUSSION 6-7 PM

Panelists: Mayor Greg Fischer, Rabbi Joe Rapport from The Temple, Dr. Muhammad Babar from Muslim Americans for Compassion, Dr. Ricky Jones from Pan-African Studies at U of L, and Chris Hartman from the Fairness Campaign
With Special Invited Guests: Kellie Watson, Louisville’s Chief Equity Officer, Edgardo Mansilla from Americana Community Center, and Cathy Berkey from The Big Table

From the recent shooting in El Paso that appears to have targeted the Hispanic community, to the Christchurch massacre of Muslims, the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh, and the shooting of two African Americans at a local grocery store, hate crimes are attacks of violence motivated by prejudice on the basis of race, religion, sexual orientation, or other grounds. As the Frazier History Museum prepares for the Violins of Hope, Strings of the Holocaust exhibition October 17 to 26, we look at hate crimes through history, what they look like today, and a call to action.

This program is free thanks to the generosity of the Violins of Hope Louisville.
Seating is limited. Please RSVP

View Event →
LET'S TALK | BRIDGING THE DIVIDE - Gay Marriage, the Church, and Fighting from Within
Aug
13
5:00 PM17:00

LET'S TALK | BRIDGING THE DIVIDE - Gay Marriage, the Church, and Fighting from Within

TUESDAY AUGUST 13, 2019.
DOORS OPEN 5 PM | ACCESS TO FIRST FLOOR EXHIBITS 5 - 6 PM | PANEL DISCUSSION 6 - 7 PM

Panelists: Greg Bourke, Michael DeLeon, and JR Zerkowski, Exec. Director of Fortunate Families.
With special Invited Guest Rev. Caitlin Simpson, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)    

They were plaintiffs in the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case legalizing same-sex marriage, now they’ve created a Catholic Scholarship at U of L for LGBTQ Students.

We talk to the couple about fighting from within, and their belief that you don’t have to choose one identity over another.

This program is Free to the Public thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor.
Seating is limited. Please RSVP using the link below.

View Event →
LET'S TALK | BRIDGING THE DIVIDE - 400th Commemoration of Enslavement in America
Jul
11
6:00 PM18:00

LET'S TALK | BRIDGING THE DIVIDE - 400th Commemoration of Enslavement in America

Panelists Include:
Dr. Kevin Cosby, Dr. F. M. Smith Jr, and Cheri Mills of Simmons College

Join our panelists for a discussion centered around the arrival of the first documented slaves who landed in Jamestown, Virginia in 1619. The talk will also center around the 40 Days of Prayer for the liberation of American descendants of slavery. The 40 Days of Prayer begins on July 12th and ends on August 20th. Every daily reading during the 40 Days of Prayer will be about an actual account of slaves escaping on the Underground Railroad. The reading will share information about the slaves perceived age (as many did not know what their age was), and the atrocities they were running from. The information and research from the readings comes from the work of William Still.

In addition to the panel discussion, Jerry Finn of Friends of the Town Clock Church will speak about its history and ties to the Underground Railroad.

August 20th marks the 400th Commemoration of Black Enslavement in America. This program serves as an invitation to the public and local ministers to engage in the national event on August 20th.

This program is Free to the Public thanks to the Horseshoe Foundation. Seating is limited. Please RSVP using the link below.

View Event →