Frazier History Museum

Outreach Performances

Costumed actor/educators are available to depict historical figures in live performances at your school. Explore how we can bring an engaging, interactive and educational program to you!

Length: 45 – 60 minutes (includes introduction, performance, and Q&A)

Group Size: Groups of 60 or less are recommended, although larger groups may be accommodated 

Hands-on haversacks / travel kits with related pre-visit lessons are available for an extra $50 to be shipped to your school in advance of certain performances.  Schools will receive the kit at least two weeks prior to the show and it will return to the museum with the actor.  Performances marked with an asterisk on the inquiry form have travel kits available by request.

Travel kits are available for rent without the accompaniment of the show as well.  Simply email education@fraziermuseum.org to make a request for a Frontier Kentucky, Underground Railroad, or Civil War-themed travel kit.  Kits without a live show are $60 per two week rental. 

Cost:

1 – 35 miles $200 / $150 to add a second show (same day)

36 – 60 miles $300 / $150 to add a second show (same day)

61 – 90 miles $400 / $150 to add a second show (same day)


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Revolutionary War:

SYBIL LUDINGTON (1777): The story of the 16-year-old girl whose midnight ride rivaled Paul Revere’s (Grades 3 – 12)

MOLLY PITCHER (1778): The heroine of the Battle of Monmouth during the American Revolution wasn’t as lady-like as you might think (Grades 3 – 12)

JAMES FORTEN (1781): Free-born Philadelphian James Forten tells of his capture and imprisonment aboard the British prison ship Jersey off the coast of New York during the American Revolution (Grades 5 – 12)

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


Frontier Kentucky: (themed haversack with pre-visit lesson is available as an add-on to the live show)

DAY IN THE LIFE: THE FRONTIER WOMAN (1780s): A pioneer woman describes life on the “western” frontier in Kentucky during the 1780’s. An interactive presentation with student involvement! (Grades K – 5)

JOHN FLOYD: KENTUCKY SURVEYOR (1781): The year 1781 was a turbulent and dangerous time for settlers in Kentucky.  Colonel Floyd tells of the difficulties and dangers that existed in what is now Jefferson County. (Grades 3 – 12)

WHISKEY REBELLION (1790’s): For the farmers struggling to survive on the early American Frontier, whiskey was an easily traded commodity and often used in place of the scarce American currency. For the new American government struggling to pay its war debts, whiskey seems the perfect product to tax. Take a look at a tumultuous time in the forming of our country through the eyes of tax collector in colonial Kentucky. (Grades 4 - 12)

 

Special thanks to the Kentucky Colonels for their generous support of our Frontier Kentucky performances and pre-visit haversacks

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


Underground Railroad: (themed travel kit with 3 pre-visit lessons is available as an add-on to the live show)

THE RUNAWAY (1850s): Inspired by the life of steamboat steward and New Albany resident William Harding, this interpretation shows what it may have been like for a slave to attempt an escape across the Ohio River from Louisville to New Albany in the 1850s (Grades 3 – 8)

 UNDERGROUND RAILROAD FACT & FICTION (mid-1800s): A time-traveling “Expert” on the Underground Railroad has come down with a rare form of Pandiculationitis. But not to worry: a willing “fill in” time traveler is available to fumble along through the presentation, dispelling myths and correcting their own ideas about what the Underground Railroad actually was (Grades 3 – 5)

LEVI COFFIN (1860s): According to Coffin’s account, he provided shelter for upwards of one thousand “fugitive slaves” during the years between 1826 until midway through the Civil War. Some referred to him as the President of the Underground Railroad. Hear, in his words, what it took to be a conductor on the Underground Railroad and why he chose to help (Grades 5 – 12)

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE (1852): The author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin talks about the experiences and motivations that prompted her to write the novel that became so influential to the anti-slavery and abolition movements in the antebellum United States (Grades 6 – 12)

 CATHERINE ATTERBURY (1850s): Catherine Atterbury, wife of the reverend at the Town Clock Church in New Albany, IN, recounts her girlhood memory of the Blackburn race riots in Detroit. She describes the two extraordinary people who escaped enslavement in Kentucky against all odds, forever inspiring her vocal abolitionism and assistance to those seeking refuge across the Ohio in the 1850s (Grades 4 – 12)

 Click here to see details about our Underground Railroad performance series!

 

Special thanks to the Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County and Kentucky Colonels for their generous support of our Underground Railroad performances and pre-visit travel kits

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663


American Civil War: (themed haversack with pre-visit lesson is available as an add-on to the live show)

 

BROTHER AGAINST BROTHER (1861-5): A 45-minute interactive program in which one of our Historic Interpreters portrays two Kentucky brothers on opposite sides of the American Civil War (Grades 4 – 8)

 COLONEL ROBERT GOULD SHAW (1863): This story is taken from the letters of the young man who led the first combat regiment of African-American soldiers, the 54th Massachusetts, during the American Civil War (Grades 4 – 12)

PHOEBE PEMBER: WHISKEY IN WAR (1860s): In a time when whiskey was the staple medicine on the battlefield, its procurement, rationing, and protection (from marauders and surgeons, alike) was essential. Drawn from the memoir of Phoebe Pember, administrator of the largest military hospital during the American Civil War“The monthly barrel was an institution and a very important one. Indeed, if it is necessary to have a hero for this matter-of-fact narrative, the whiskey barrel will have to step forward and make his bow.” (Grades 9 – 12)

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


Lewis and Clark:

 TALES FROM THE TRAIL: NATIVE AMERICAN STORIES: Selected stories from the Sioux, Shoshone, and Nez Perce tribes encountered by Lewis and Clark, designed for the family and younger audiences (Grades K – 5)

 YORK (1805): The man enslaved to William Clark is a Louisvillian who played a significant role in the Corps of Discovery. He tells of the expedition's preparations to cross the Rocky Mountains and their meeting with the Shoshone Indians (Grades 3 – 12)

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


Gilded Age:

 IMMIGRANT SEAMSTRESS (1900): Exploring “the good, the bad, and the ugly” of the Gilded Age, an Irish immigrant seamstress working in a Louisville dress shop sheds some light on working conditions and fashion in the early 1900s (Grades 5 – 12)

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


American West:

 DAY IN THE LIFE: THE COWBOY (1860s –1890s): A cowboy describes life in the 19thcentury American West during this interactive presentation that includes student participation!  Schools have the option to request an African American Cowboy if they would like to incorporate the role of African Americans in the American West.  (Grades K – 3)

 THE ADVENTURES OF PECOS BILL (1860s –1890s): The tall tale of cowboy hero Pecos Bill comes to life with puppetry and audience interaction (Grades K – 3)

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


Kentucky Derby:

 THE KENTUCKY DERBY - 1904:  Mrs. Laska Durnell tells the story of how her horse won the 30th Kentucky Derby and was at that time the only Derby winner owned by a woman (Grades 4 -12)

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663. 


Prohibition:

 MAGGIE BAILEY (1930s): Known as "Queen of the Mountain Bootleggers," Maggie Bailey from Harlan County, KY, tells the story of how she became one of the South's most prolific bootleggers during the Prohibition Era (Grades 9 – 12)

 

Ready to book? Please fill out this inquiry form and our Reservations Team will contact you to book your program. Questions? Reach us at (502)753-5663.


Cost:

1-30 miles away = $200.00 for the first session / $150 for each additional (same day)

31-45 miles away = $225.00 for the first session / $150 for each additional (same day)

46-60 miles away – $250.00 for the first session / $150 for each additional (same day)

*The hands-on haversack/travel kit with pre-visit lessons for an additional $50.00