Frazier History Museum

Guided Programs with Core Content Information

Kentucky Pioneers and Tools of the Trade (Same description and core content for Indiana Pioneers)

Grades 3- 5
Minimum 15/maximum 120 students

In this hands-on/minds-on program students explore the life and hardships of early Kentucky pioneers. Students handle reproduction tools and make predictions about their uses, discovering what the tools “tell us” about people living in frontier Kentucky.  In the galleries, students investigate the history of Kentucky through careful observation of maps, images and primary source artifacts. The program concludes with a live performance about life on the (Kentucky) frontier.

Want to make a day of it?  Our Reservation Specialist can help you add a visit to an additional site that would complement the program.  Possibilities include: Viewing KentuckyShow! at the KY Science Center (one block away),  a visit to Historic Locust Grove (Thursdays only) or a visit to the Blackacre State nature Preserve and Historic Homestead (payments will be made separately at each location)

Core Content:

SS-04-5.1.1 Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g. artifacts diaries, timelines) to describe significant events in the history of KY and interpret different perspectives.

SS-04-4.4.1 Students will explain and give examples of how people adapted to/modified the physical environment (e.g. natural resources, physical geography, natural disasters) to meet their needs during the history of KY and explain its impact on the environment today.

SS-04-5.2.2 Students will identify and compare the cultures of diverse groups and explain why people explored and settled in KY.

SS-04-2.3.1 Students will describe various forms of interaction (compromise, cooperation, conflict) that occurred during the early settlement of KY between diverse groups (Native Americans, early settlers).

AH-1.13 Students make sense of ideas and communicate ideas with the visual arts.

 

Brother Against Brother: Kentucky During the Civil War

Grades 4-8
Minimum 15/maximum 80 students
(Available Tuesday through Friday)

During this unique program, students gain an understanding of the important role Kentucky played during the American Civil War and learn about the daily life of a Civil War soldier. Students participate in a 45-minute interactive presentation by an actor portraying both a Union and a Confederate soldier from Kentucky. They are part of the action by learning marching drills, bandaging a wounded soldier and handling objects from a Civil War haversack. Afterwards, students complete an investigation guide in the museum’s galleries.

Core Content: 

SS-05-5.1.1 Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g. artifacts diaries, timelines) to describe significant events in the history of the U.S. and interpret different perspectives.

SS-05-5.2.4 Students will describe significant historical events in each of the broad historical periods and eras in U.S.history (Colonization and Settlement, Revolution and a New Nation, Expansion and Conflict, Industrialization and Immigration, Twentieth Century to present) and explain cause and effect relationships.

SS-05-5.2.3 Students will compare change over time (Colonization, Industrialization, Twentieth Century to Present) in communication, technology, transportation and education.

SS-08-5.1.2 Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those relationships.

SS-08-5.2.4Students will describe the political, social, economic and cultural differences (e.g. slavery, tariffs, industrialism vs agrarianism, federal vs state’s rights) among sections of the U.S. and explain how these differences resulted in the American Civil War.

SS-08-2.3.1 Students will explain how conflict and competition (e.g. political, economic, religious, ethnic) occurred among individuals and groups in the United States prior to Reconstruction.

 

Declaring Your Independence

Grades 5-8
Minimum 15/maximum 120 students

What inspired colonists to risk their lives to gain independence?  The taxes and acts that so infuriated many of the colonists, and led to the American Revolution, are re-imagined as modern-day scenarios.  By acting out the situations, students make connections and draw conclusions about this tumultuous time in our history.  In the galleries, students work on investigation guides to explore the theme of independence throughout American history.  The time-period comes to life, as students view a colonial-themed live performance.

Want to make a day of it?  Our Reservation Specialist can help you add a visit to an additional site that would complement the program.  Possibilities include: Viewing We the People in the KY Science Center’s digital theatre (one block away) or a visit to the Sons of the American Revolution. (Payments will be made separately at each location)

Core Content:

SS-05-2.3.1 Students will describe various forms of interaction (compromise, cooperation, conflict) that occurred between diverse groups (e.g. Native Americans, European explorers, English colonists, British parliament) in the history of the United States.

SS-05-5.1.1 Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g. artifacts diaries, timelines) to describe significant events in the history of the U.S. and interpret different perspectives.

SS-05-5.2.4 Students will describe significant historical events in each of the broad historical periods and eras in U.S.history (Colonization and Settlement, Revolution and a New Nation, Expansion and Conflict, Industrialization and Immigration, Twentieth Century to present) and explain cause and effect relationships.

SS-05-5.2.3 Students will compare change over time (Colonization, Industrialization, Twentieth Century to Present) in communication, technology, transportation, and education .

SS-08-5.1.2 Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those relationships.

SS-08-2.3.1 Students will explain how conflict and competition (e.g. political, economic, religious, ethnic) occurred among individuals and groups in the United States prior to Reconstruction.

SS-08.5.2.2 Students will explain and give examples of how the ideals of equality and personal liberty (rise of individual rights, economic freedom, religious diversity) that developed during the colonial period were motivations for the American Revolution and proved instrumental in the development of the new nation.

SS-08-1.3.1 Students will give examples of how significant U.S. documents (Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights) established democratic principles and guaranteed certain rights for all citizens.

AH-P-SA-S-DT4 Students will explore a variety of dramatic works (e.g., theater and dramatic media – film, television)

History Mystery

Grades 6-12
Minimum 15/maximum 130 students

Taking place entirely in the museum galleries, “History Mystery” is a structured yet interactive program that leads students on a search for historical clues. Students work in small groups to discover a mystery artifact and find clues in the museum exhibits that solve the mystery. Professional museum educators are on-hand to help in your exploration. The program includes a live historical performance that ties into your unit of study.

Core Content:

SS-07-5.1.2 Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those relationships.

SS-07-2.3.1 Students will explain how conflict and competition (e.g. political, economic, religious, ethnic) occurred among individuals and groups in early civilizations prior to 1500 A.D.

SS-08-5.1.2 Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those relationships. 

SS-HS-5.1.2 Students will analyze how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships, tying past to present.

SS-HS-5.1.1 Students will use a variety of tools (e.g. primary and secondary sources, data, artifacts) to analyze perceptions and perspectives (e.g. gender, race, region, ethnic group, nationality, age, economic status, religion, politics, geographic factors) of people and historical events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States History (Reconstruction to present).

SS-HS-5.1.1 Students will use a variety of tools to analyze perceptions and perspectives of people and historical events in the modern world and United States history.

AH-P-SA-S-DT4 Students will explore a variety of dramatic works (e.g., theater and dramatic media – film, television)